These days

These days I’ll focus on one arena of physics that women are prolific in (numbers and pubs), that is astronomy. Yes there are a number of women gladly occupying small posts or large enough ones such as Jill Carter of the SETI project for example, where we should-a, ought-a, not-ta complain so much about the missing proportions of females in physics. Astronomy is Physics – right? Wrong. They are not equivalent, one is a subset of the other and often acts like the red-haired step-child. We physicists and Astronomers do get into it on occasion about ‘snobbery’ on our part (we physicists that is), but I’m not likely to take a stand now as I’m not employed in either field at present. Yet the rustling about seems to be a reflection of other issues such as professional respect, funding, ???? And what about the relative abundance of gals in that field – astronomy? Is it more welcoming or is it that snobbery along with the last bastion of male dominance prevents women from continuing onwards into physics research, an academic or think tank post? I think I said it in an earlier post on a report of a researcher who discovered that women are still burdened by their parents illusions that they can be supermoms and super physicists at the same time. I know I thought I could do it and I did; full time physics grad student as well as scout mom to two boys, soccer mom, grad teaching fellow, door matting to other family who thought I could satisfy their expectations and needs at the same time. And after graduation; fighting for funding, not able to move to a postdoc elsewhere, running an observatory and planetarium curriculum development program, etc, etc. If anyone outside has a perspective on this – feel free to write in. I got to get off my touchas and seriously get my blogging together for this to be of any benefit to others.
Advertisements

About Deborah Leddon

Vegetarian Mother and Wife, Scientist at UTD CSS, passionate about my family, animal rights, the outdoors and my violin.
This entry was posted in Gender Issues, History of Science. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s